Tourism Policing

TOURIST-ORIENTED POLICING FOR COMMUNITY ORDER, PROTECTION AND SAFETY IN AURANGABAD DISTRICT

The gateway to the World Heritage Sites of Ajanta and Ellora, Aurangabad is named after the Mughal emperor, Aurangzeb. Lying along the right bank of the Kham River

Tourist Attractions in Aurangabad District

Ajanta and Ellora Caves

             

    Aurangabad, too, has a group of Caves which are quite beautiful. These Buddhist Caves were carved out of the hillside in the 6th or 7th century AD. The Ajanta caves include paintings and sculptures considered to be masterpieces of both Buddhist religious art as well as frescos which are reminiscent of the Sigiriya paintings in Sri Lanka. Ellora represents the epitome of Indian rock-cut architecture. The 34 "caves" actually structures excavated out of the vertical face of the Charanandri hills being Buddhist, Hindu and Jain rock cut temples and monasteries, were built between the 5th century and 10th century.

Bibi Ka Maqbara

    Built by Azam Shah in 1678, the Bibi ka Maqbara is a sons loving tribute to his mother, Begum Rabia Durrani, the Queen of Mughal emperor Aurangzeb. Standing spectacularly on the lawns of the landscaped garden with ponds, fountains and water channels, the white marbled monument rises majestically in an intentional bid to copy and rival the world famous Taj Mahal of Agra. The central tomb, distinguished by elaborate surface ornamentation and intricately perforated marble screens, is framed by four towering minarets.

Panchakki (water mill)

    An engineering feat of the time is the Panchakki, or the water mill built by Malik Ambar in 1695. The water, channeled from a spring on a distant hill was used to power the flour mill and grind grain for the pilgrims. An intriguing water mill, the Panchakki is famous for its underground water channel, which traverses more than 8 km to its source away in the mountains. The channel culminates in a mesmerising "artificial" waterfall that powers the mill. The beauty of the mosque housed in the inner enclosure is enhanced by a series of "dancing" water fountains.

Jayakwadi Dam

    The Jayakwadi project is one of the largest irrigation projects in the Indian state of Maharashtra. It is a multipurpose project. Its water is used mainly to irrigate agricultural land in the drought-prone Marathwada region of Maharashtra. It also provides water for drinking and industrial usage to nearby towns and villages and to the municipalities and industrial areas of Aurangabad and Jalna. The surrounding area of the dam has a garden and a bird sanctuary.

Daulatabad Fort

    Daulatabad meaning "City of Prosperity", is a 14th-century fort city in Maharashtra, India, about 16 kilometers northwest of Aurangabad. The place, was once as known as "Deogiri". Starting 1327, it famously remained the capital of Tughlaq dynasty, under Muhammad bin Tughluq (r. 1325-1351), who also changed its name, and forcibily moved the entire population of Delhi here, for two years, before it was abandoned due to lack of water.

Kailasha temple at Ellora

        

    The Kailasa temple also known as Kailasanatha temple is a famous rock cut monument, one of the 34 monasteries and temples known collectively as the Ellora Caves, extending over more than 2 km, that were dug side by side in the wall of a high basalt cliff in the complex located at Ellora, Aurangabad. Of these, the Kailasa (cave 16) is a remarkable example of Dravidian architecture on account of its striking proportion, elaborate workmanship, architectural content, and sculptural ornamentation of rock-cut architecture. The temple was commissioned and completed between dated 757-783 CE, when Krishna I ruled the Rashtrakuta dynasty. It is designed to recall Mount Kailash, the home of Lord Shiva. It is a megalith carved out of one single rock. It was built in the 8th century by the Rashtrakuta king Krishna I.

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